Work Zone Speed Camera Program Hope to Reduce Injuries Around Philly

Drivers who don’t slow down in work zones are going to be lighter in the wallet after a new program gets the go-ahead. The idea is to get motorists to take work zones more seriously and to save lives. Drivers who get tagged going 11 or more over the speed limit will get a ticket in the mail. The first will be a warning, the second will be a fine of $75, and then $150 after that.

Where are the Cameras?

The cameras have been up and running the last 60 days in a dozen sites around the state in a pre-enforcement period which ended March 4, 2020. After that, the program went live, and drivers have begun receiving their warnings and citations in the mail.

There are three cites around Philadelphia near the Lansdale interchange on I-476, on I-78 in Berks County and most notably, on Roosevelt Expressway in the city. You can check for yourself if you want to know ahead of time where the cameras will be located.

What Happens to My Insurance Rate?

The program was authorized by the state legislature in 2018 and has been going through testing and trial periods. The law allows for civil fines only, and officials have assured that there will be no points on the violator’s driver’s license, nor will insurance companies be allowed to raise your rates because of a violation.

“The goal is to build awareness and most importantly, to change unsafe driving behaviors.”

—Pennsylvania Turnpike CEO Mark Compton

In a statement released by PA Turnpike CEO Mark Compton, he stressed that the reason was not to make money for the state or to punish speeders. “This program is about protecting everybody’s safety. If not for these workers in an active work zone, I ask you to slow down for yourself and other travelers,” he said.

Work Zone Accidents:

Roadside work zones are some of the most dangerous places to be in Pennsylvania with 1,804 work zone crashes in Pennsylvania, which resulted in 23 fatalities, and 43 percent of work zone crashes resulted in fatalities and/or injuries.

Historically, workers catch the brunt of fatalities and injuries, Since 1970, PennDOT has lost 89 workers in the line of duty, and the Turnpike has lost 45 workers since 1945, according to a study from PennDot.

“The goal is to build awareness and most importantly, to change unsafe driving behaviors,” Pennsylvania Turnpike CEO Mark Compton said. “The program serves as a roadway reminder that safety is literally in each driver’s hands when they are behind the wheel.”